Culture

Like Father, Like Son

There are so many things that I want to give my son. I thought that this sentiment would be that of my friends and acquaintances, but their concern was more surface. I remember the first time someone said it, “You don’t want your son to have fro hair like yours, do you?” My hopes of looking at him and seeing the best parts of me, of us, sharing the same barber, of people saying “you’re your daddy’s son’, were suddenly being diluted to a standard of attractiveness that was the antithesis of me.


From Dubious to Jamai

 

 

Meeting the parents is a big deal in any culture. For South Asians, it’s essentially a prelude to getting engaged. You’re telling your parents that this is the person you can expect me to marry and it’s typically met with anticipation that a big fat Indian wedding is forthcoming for the family.


In The Shadows

In The Shadows

I'm convinced that the number of Black x South Asian couples would double in size — if we could date openly without persecution. Instead, many of our relationships lie hidden in the shadows waiting for the perfect moment to emerge.

Managing The Guilt of A Blindian Relationship

Managing The Guilt of A Blindian Relationship

“What’s the matter?” “I can’t be with you,” she replied.
This was the moment that I realized the guilt that consumed her for being in a relationship with a black man. And how it had presented an emotional albatross for her. 

Scarred On The Inside - Exploring Colorism

We often think of colorism as causing pain to only dark-skinned people that society views as lower in worth, less attractive, and more criminal than lighter-skinned people. However, this couldn't be further from the truth. Scarred on the inside is contributor Keisha Matthews' recollection of how colorism affected her family while growing up.